NSU Newsroom

SharkBytes

Horizons

This version of NSU News has been archived as of February 28, 2019. To search through archived articles, visit nova.edu/search. To access the new version of NSU News, visit news.nova.edu.

This version of SharkBytes has been archived as of February 28, 2019. To search through archived articles, visit nova.edu/search. To access the new version of SharkBytes, visit sharkbytes.nova.edu.

News Releases Archive

Contact

Division of Public Relations and Marketing Communications
Nova Southeastern University
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796

nova.edu/prmc

SharkBytes Archives

Contact

Division of Public Relations and Marketing Communications
Nova Southeastern University
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796

(954) 262-5353
(800) 541-6682 x25353
Fax: (954) 262-3954
communications@nova.edu

Psychology Graduate Series Opens Semester with Two Talks, Sept. 12

The first talk in the Fall 2012 Psychology Graduate Research Series, co-hosted by the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences and NSU’s Center for Psychological Studies (CPS), will feature presentations by two students in the college’s M.S. in Experimental Psychology program.

Psychology Graduate Research Series
Presentations by Michele Alesia and Juliana Acosta
Wednesday, Sept. 12
Noon–1:00 p.m.
Parker Building | Room 338

About the Talks
“When Competition Turns Costly: Exploring the Prevalence of Cooperative and Competitive Mating Strategies Among Female Friends”
By Michele Alesia | Faculty Adviser: Valerie Starratt, Ph.D., assistant professor at the college

Intrasexual competition, competition between same-sex rivals for access to the most-desirable mates, has been identified as a female mating strategy. However, research has yet to examine the extent to which women continue to use this strategy, compared to non-competitive mating strategies, when the same-sex rivals are friends. Using an experimental methodology, Alesia examines the relationship between female mating strategy and rival familiarity. The influence of potential mediating variables, including physical attractiveness, personality, and self-esteem, are also considered.

“Speaking Two Languages Modifies Neural Inhibitory Control”
By Juliana Acosta | Faculty Adviser: Mercedes Fernandez, Ph.D., associate professor at the college

In this talk, Acosta explains recent findings from her research, which reveals differences in brainwave activity between monolinguals and bilinguals on a task unrelated to language. She will also discuss the long-term effects of these neural changes.

The Psychology Graduate Research Series is free and open to the public. Pizza will be served. For more information, contact Jaime Tartar, Ph.D., associate professor and coordinator of psychology research at the college, at (954) 262-8192.