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This version of NSU News has been archived as of February 28, 2019. To search through archived articles, visit nova.edu/search. To access the new version of NSU News, visit news.nova.edu.

This version of SharkBytes has been archived as of February 28, 2019. To search through archived articles, visit nova.edu/search. To access the new version of SharkBytes, visit sharkbytes.nova.edu.

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Division of Public Relations and Marketing Communications
Nova Southeastern University
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796

nova.edu/prmc

SharkBytes Archives

Contact

Division of Public Relations and Marketing Communications
Nova Southeastern University
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796

(954) 262-5353
(800) 541-6682 x25353
Fax: (954) 262-3954
communications@nova.edu

What is Fibromyalgia?

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Fibromyalgia is a disorder of unknown etiology characterized by widespread pain, abnormal pain processing, sleep disturbance, fatigue and often psychological distress. People with fibromyalgia may also have other symptoms; such as,
    • Morning stiffness
    • Tingling or numbness in hands and feet
    • Headaches, including migraines
    • Irritable bowel syndrome
    • Sleep disturbances
    • Cognitive problems with thinking and memory (sometimes called “fibro fog”)
    • Problems with thinking and memory (sometimes called “fibro fog”)
    • Painful menstrual periods and other pain syndromes
  • The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 2010 criteria is used for clinical diagnosis and severity classification. Diagnosis is based on:
  • Symptoms have been present at a similar level for at least 3 months.
  • The patient does not have a disorder that would otherwise explain the pain. Full criteria  [PDF – 130KB] .

Fibromyalgia often co-occurs (up to 25-65%) with other rheumatic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and ankylosing spondylitis (AS).