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This version of NSU News has been archived as of February 28, 2019. To search through archived articles, visit nova.edu/search. To access the new version of NSU News, visit news.nova.edu.

This version of SharkBytes has been archived as of February 28, 2019. To search through archived articles, visit nova.edu/search. To access the new version of SharkBytes, visit sharkbytes.nova.edu.

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Division of Public Relations and Marketing Communications
Nova Southeastern University
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796

nova.edu/prmc

SharkBytes Archives

Contact

Division of Public Relations and Marketing Communications
Nova Southeastern University
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796

(954) 262-5353
(800) 541-6682 x25353
Fax: (954) 262-3954
communications@nova.edu

The Pomegranate–Just open and eat!

Submitted by Marilyn Gordon, Ed.D., RDN CSSD LDN

Registered Dietitian/Nutritionist

For some reason I always thought that the pomegranate would be difficult to prepare for eating so I never bothered. I love pomegranate juice and drink it every day for the antioxidant benefits.  It is also a good source of Vitamins, A, C, K, folate, and fiber. A recent food magazine highlighted pomegranate seeds in a few recipes so I had the fruit on my radar. As I was shopping at the produce market, I found whole, fresh pomegranates and decided to see what I could do with them.

The magazine had step by step instructions which happened to work quite well so if you are intrigued;

  1. Go buy a couple of pomegranates.
  2. Gather a medium sized bowl and fill it half way with water.
  3. Cut off each end of the pomegranate so that you can see the seeds. Then cut through the tough skin end to end just until you reach the seeds. (Make about 4 cuts).
  4. Submerge the fruit and begin to peel off the outer skin, the fruit will open fairly easily. Pomegranate juice does stain so keeping it under the water prevents any accidents with the juice.
  5. Separate the purplish seeds from the white pithy part. The peel and pith will float; the seeds will sink to the bottom of your bowl.

Depending on the size of the original fruit, you will have approximately ½ cup-3/4 cup of seeds. You can enjoy them plain; add to yogurt, your cereal, or a salad.

Pomegranates are grown in Florida and considered an alternative crop to citrus.