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This version of NSU News has been archived as of February 28, 2019. To search through archived articles, visit nova.edu/search. To access the new version of NSU News, visit news.nova.edu.

This version of SharkBytes has been archived as of February 28, 2019. To search through archived articles, visit nova.edu/search. To access the new version of SharkBytes, visit sharkbytes.nova.edu.

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Contact

Division of Public Relations and Marketing Communications
Nova Southeastern University
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796

nova.edu/prmc

SharkBytes Archives

Contact

Division of Public Relations and Marketing Communications
Nova Southeastern University
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796

(954) 262-5353
(800) 541-6682 x25353
Fax: (954) 262-3954
communications@nova.edu

Recycle your E-Waste in an Environmentally and Socially Responsible Way

Source: slate.com

Computers, TVs, cell phones, and other electronic waste can be tricky and dangerous to recycle because they contain hazardous materials like lead, mercury, and cadmium. Worse yet, e-waste often ends up in makeshift salvage yards in third world countries, where workers use personally and environmentally dangerous methods to process the waste. Fortunately, there are ways to ditch your e-waste safely and responsibly.

If your electronics are working and not too old, you may want to donate or sell them instead of throwing them away. Check if friends or relatives need your old machines, or donate your e-waste to a reputable refurbisher.

However, machines more than five years old should be recycled. Try to use a processor that is a member of the e-Stewards program. These companies have pledged not to export hazardous electronic waste to developing countries. If you can’t access one of them, try using a manufacturer-sponsored recycle program or utilize the collection programs from electronics stores like Best Buy or Staples.