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This version of NSU News has been archived as of February 28, 2019. To search through archived articles, visit nova.edu/search. To access the new version of NSU News, visit news.nova.edu.

This version of SharkBytes has been archived as of February 28, 2019. To search through archived articles, visit nova.edu/search. To access the new version of SharkBytes, visit sharkbytes.nova.edu.

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Division of Public Relations and Marketing Communications
Nova Southeastern University
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796

nova.edu/prmc

SharkBytes Archives

Contact

Division of Public Relations and Marketing Communications
Nova Southeastern University
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796

(954) 262-5353
(800) 541-6682 x25353
Fax: (954) 262-3954
communications@nova.edu

NSU Researcher Spotlight: The Prevalence of Vitreomacular Adhesion in Patients 40 Years and Older

Julie Rodman, O.D., M.Sc., FAAO.

Julie Rodman, O.D., M.Sc., FAAO.

Julie Rodman, O.D., M.Sc., FAAO, associate professor in the College of Optometry, is the principal investigator of an investigator-initiated study titled “The Prevalence of Vitreomacular Adhesion in Patients 40 Years and Older (VAST).” Funded by ThromboGenics, Optovue, Carl Zeiss Meditac, and Nova Southeastern University, the research team includes faculty in the College of Optometry as well as Indiana University College of Optometry, Pacific University College of Optometry, and private optometry and ophthalmology practices nationwide.

As a person gets older, the vitreous gel (the clear gel between the lens and the retina) in the eye commonly separates from the retina. Vitreomacular adhesion (VMA) is a condition in which, instead of separating, the vitreous gel adheres to the retina in an abnormally strong manner. This can distort a person’s vision and result in vitreomacular traction (VMT), which can cause damage to the eye. Early detection of VMA can help prevent damage and improve a person’s visual prognosis.

“VAST” is a prospective, cross-sectional study looking at the prevalence of VMA and VMT in a diverse group of subjects over 40 years of age.  Secondary analyses will include correlations between the presence of VMA/VMT and gender, ethnicity, and/or refractive error.

Identifying the prevalence of vitreomacular adhesion and its associated complications will yield valuable, new epidemiologic data, leading to improved diagnosis and management of patients with this condition. With the emergence of high-resolution scanning devices such as the optical coherence tomography over the past two decades, there is a greater understanding of the pathophysiology of the disorders of the vitreomacular interface and their role in the development of various maculopathies.  Detection, management and proper treatment of these patients is crucial in securing an optimal outcome for our patients.  Up to this point, there have been limited epidemiological studies reported in the literature on the prevalence of vitreomacular adhesion resulting in a significant gap in the literature regarding this entity.  The anticipated completion date for the VAST study is summer 2016.

Preliminary data was presented at the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology annual meeting.