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This version of NSU News has been archived as of February 28, 2019. To search through archived articles, visit nova.edu/search. To access the new version of NSU News, visit news.nova.edu.

This version of SharkBytes has been archived as of February 28, 2019. To search through archived articles, visit nova.edu/search. To access the new version of SharkBytes, visit sharkbytes.nova.edu.

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Division of Public Relations and Marketing Communications
Nova Southeastern University
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796

nova.edu/prmc

SharkBytes Archives

Contact

Division of Public Relations and Marketing Communications
Nova Southeastern University
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796

(954) 262-5353
(800) 541-6682 x25353
Fax: (954) 262-3954
communications@nova.edu

NSU Research Spotlight: Lubov Nathanson, Ph.D.

Dr. Lubov Nathanson-2014

Lubov Nathanson, Ph.D.

Lubov Nathanson, Ph.D., assistant professor in the College of Osteopathic Medicine’s Institute for Neuro-Immune Medicine (INIM), recently applied for a grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH)/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke to fund her research study titled “Genomic Approach to Find Novel Biomarkers and Mechanisms of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME).”

Current management of CFS/ME relies solely on symptom management to improve quality of life but does not address the underlying mechanisms, the onset, or the progression of the disease. In an effort to provide insight into the key biological targets involved in CFS/ME presentation, the main objectives of Nathanson’s research are to identify novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets of CFS/ME and provide insight into disease onset and progression. Her research, which will be conducted over a three-year timespan, aims to use peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients recruited for the institute’s recent research study funded by the NIH.

“We aim to expand our research efforts by using modern genomic technologies, such as an RNA sequencing, copy number variation, and genomic DNA methylation, which lead to a better-targeted therapeutic intervention,” Nathanson said.