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This version of NSU News has been archived as of February 28, 2019. To search through archived articles, visit nova.edu/search. To access the new version of NSU News, visit news.nova.edu.

This version of SharkBytes has been archived as of February 28, 2019. To search through archived articles, visit nova.edu/search. To access the new version of SharkBytes, visit sharkbytes.nova.edu.

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Division of Public Relations and Marketing Communications
Nova Southeastern University
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796

nova.edu/prmc

SharkBytes Archives

Contact

Division of Public Relations and Marketing Communications
Nova Southeastern University
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796

(954) 262-5353
(800) 541-6682 x25353
Fax: (954) 262-3954
communications@nova.edu

NSU Research Spotlight: Halmos College Galapagos Shark Research Featured in National Geographic

National Geographic Hammerhead

This October, the iconic magazine National Geographic published an article on Galapagos hammerhead sharks. These sharks, with their wide-eyed appearance are some of the most iconic species found around these small Ecuadoran islands. One of the many questions about this species is where do they go to give birth? Halmos College professor Mahmood Shivji, Ph.D. worked with the National Geographic explorer team to track these sharks.

“That tracking data shows at least three of the sharks leaving for the mainland,” says Shivji. The researchers say they knew the sharks are migrating to the mainland, but the new tag data could help determine if they’re doing so specifically to give birth.

“That’s where the DNA comes in”, says Shivji. For next steps, the team will conduct paternity tests between adult sharks in the Galapagos and pups found in nurseries around the Galapagos and coastal mainland regions. Sharks help keep marine prey species in check, thus creating a more balanced ecosystem. Studies often cited by conservation groups also show how much they can benefit coastal economies. From activities like tourism and diving, a shark in Palau may be worth more than $1 million throughout its lifetime; sharks in the Bahamas generated $114 million in 2014; and sharks generated $221 million for Florida’s economy in 2016.

For more information: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/2018/10/new-find-could-save-galapagos-hammerhead-sharks/