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This version of NSU News has been archived as of February 28, 2019. To search through archived articles, visit nova.edu/search. To access the new version of NSU News, visit news.nova.edu.

This version of SharkBytes has been archived as of February 28, 2019. To search through archived articles, visit nova.edu/search. To access the new version of SharkBytes, visit sharkbytes.nova.edu.

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Division of Public Relations and Marketing Communications
Nova Southeastern University
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796

nova.edu/prmc

SharkBytes Archives

Contact

Division of Public Relations and Marketing Communications
Nova Southeastern University
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796

(954) 262-5353
(800) 541-6682 x25353
Fax: (954) 262-3954
communications@nova.edu

NSU Research Spotlight: Exploring the Feasibility of Using Non-Invasive Route for Treatment of Organophosphates Toxicity

Mutasem Rawas-Qalaji, B. Pharm., Ph.D.

Mutasem Rawas-Qalaji, B. Pharm., Ph.D.

The use of organophosphates worldwide, as nerve agents and pesticides, was reported to cause 3 million toxicity cases per year. According to the American Association of Poison Control Centers, nearly 7,000 toxicity cases were recorded in the last two years in the United States due to their use as pesticides. Atropine sulfate 2 mg intramuscular injection is the recommended antidote for organophosphates toxicity. Nevertheless, the use of current atropine sulfate intramuscular injection, AtroPen®, during organophosphates toxicity emergency has several limitations. To overcome some of these limitations, the sublingual route has been investigated as an accessible and user-friendly alternative route of administration for atropine sulfate.

Mutasem Rawas-Qalaji, B. Pharm., Ph.D., associate professor of pharmaceutics at NSU’s College of Pharmacy, along with his research team, developed and evaluated novel rapidly disintegrating sublingual tablets of atropine sulfate. Ex vivo studies have showed that the sublingual membrane is permeable to atropine sulfate and has the potential as an alternative route for the administration of atropine sulfate for the potential treatment of organophosphates toxicity.

“The sublingual route seems feasible for atropine administration as a potential alternative and non-invasive route for the treatment of organophosphates toxicity,” Qalaji said.

The research team consisted of Mutasem Rawas-Qalaji, B. Pharm., Ph.D., and Alhussain Aodah, Ph.D. Candidate, at NSU.

Their findings were presented during the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) Annual Meeting (Nov 26, 2014), San Diego, CA and were published as peer reviewed abstracts.