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This version of NSU News has been archived as of February 28, 2019. To search through archived articles, visit nova.edu/search. To access the new version of NSU News, visit news.nova.edu.

This version of SharkBytes has been archived as of February 28, 2019. To search through archived articles, visit nova.edu/search. To access the new version of SharkBytes, visit sharkbytes.nova.edu.

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Contact

Division of Public Relations and Marketing Communications
Nova Southeastern University
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796

nova.edu/prmc

SharkBytes Archives

Contact

Division of Public Relations and Marketing Communications
Nova Southeastern University
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796

(954) 262-5353
(800) 541-6682 x25353
Fax: (954) 262-3954
communications@nova.edu

A Greener Fixer-Upper: Green Remodeling Tips

Source: The Sierra Club

As the average U.S. home size increases, demanding more energy and materials, living smaller is a surefire way to reduce your ecological footprint. It’s also an opportunity to enjoy thoughtful design and a simpler lifestyle. Here are tips for making the transition:

  • A bigger house is not always better. Notice how you use your current dwelling and where you spend your time. For example, do you really need a formal dining room?
  • When removing old cabinets and countertops, carefully disassemble them and reuse the materials elsewhere in your home, or donate them to an organization like Habitat for Humanity.
  • Save energy by going double-paned when replacing windows, and installing solar panels the next time you redo your roof.
  • Go vertical; cathedral ceilings make rooms feel more spacious and can hold sleeping lofts.
  • Finish your small home with details you’ll love – stained glass or walnut filigree, for example. In smaller spaces, they’re more affordable.
  • For more ideas and tips, visit the Small House Society, or TinyHouses.net.

Be Wise About Water: Water Saving Tips

  • Use a broom instead of a hose to clear your driveway.
  • Your lawn only needs .5 to 1.5 inches of water per week, so use an empty tuna can to measure when you’ve reached the limit.
  • Air drying uses 15 to 50 percent less energy in practically the same amount of time, so use your dishwasher’s air-dry setting instead of the heat-dry option. If it doesn’t have an air-dry setting, simply open the door once the final rinse is complete.

Fast Fact: If each U.S. household installed one low-flow sink faucet or aerator, it would save more than 60 billion gallons of water annually.