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This version of SharkBytes has been archived as of February 28, 2019. To search through archived articles, visit nova.edu/search. To access the new version of SharkBytes, visit sharkbytes.nova.edu.

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Nova Southeastern University
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796

nova.edu/prmc

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Contact

Division of Public Relations and Marketing Communications
Nova Southeastern University
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796

(954) 262-5353
(800) 541-6682 x25353
Fax: (954) 262-3954
communications@nova.edu

Next Graduate Psychology Talk to Discuss Neurological Processing Speeds, Jan. 9

The first presentation in the winter 2013 Psychology Graduate Research Series, co-hosted by the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences and NSU’s Center for Psychological Studies (CPS), will discuss ongoing research concerning variations in humans’ neurological processing speeds.

“Processing-Speed Variation as Assessed by the Trail-Making Task  and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scales”
Psychology Graduate Research Series | Sean Coad, student at CPS
Wednesday, Jan. 9, Noon–1:00 p.m.
Maltz Psychology Building | Room 2044

About the Talk

Processing speed is defined as the ability to automatically and to fluently perform relatively easy and overlearned cognitive tasks. Multiple neuropsychological tools can be utilized to measure this construct. It is hypothesized that these processing-speed tools would show consistent results across examinees. However, clinicians frequently fail to account for underlying neurological and cognitive processes that differ among these tools, which could affect the tests’ ability to obtain true results about the clients’ processing-speed capabilities. This talk discusses research conducted using two types of tests designed to measure processing speed, and analyzes the varying results.

Coad is working under the guidance of faculty adviser Charles Golden, Ph.D.,
professor at CPS.

The Psychology Graduate Research Series is free and open to the public. Pizza will be served. For more information, contact Jaime Tartar, Ph.D., associate professor and coordinator of psychology research at the college, or Sarah Valley-Gray, Psy.D., associate professor at CPS.