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This version of NSU News has been archived as of February 28, 2019. To search through archived articles, visit nova.edu/search. To access the new version of NSU News, visit news.nova.edu.

This version of SharkBytes has been archived as of February 28, 2019. To search through archived articles, visit nova.edu/search. To access the new version of SharkBytes, visit sharkbytes.nova.edu.

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Contact

Division of Public Relations and Marketing Communications
Nova Southeastern University
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796

nova.edu/prmc

SharkBytes Archives

Contact

Division of Public Relations and Marketing Communications
Nova Southeastern University
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796

(954) 262-5353
(800) 541-6682 x25353
Fax: (954) 262-3954
communications@nova.edu

Facts about Going Green & Recycling

Source: www.ehow.com

Facts about Going Green & Recycling

1. Separating Recyclable Items

  • Some localities are going to single-stream recycling; that is, all recyclables are placed in one container. However, if you are still required to separate recyclables, or you just want to, separate them into these categories:
  • Paper, which includes cardboard and paper cartons as well as paper plates, napkins and towels. Keep newspapers and magazines separate, however.
  • Metal — which includes aluminum foil, cooking and serving dishes, wire coat hangers, cans and aerosol containers — can be put in one container, and plastic — which includes water bottles and milk or juice cartons — goes into another.
  • Glass jars and bottles, as well as broken glass and other glass products, go into a separate container. If the container is closed or cannot be seen through or into, you may want to mark it as containing glass with a warning to handle carefully.

2. How a Product Is Recycled

  • The recycling process starts with the collection and processing of the recycled materials. If you have garbage pickup service that provides recycling collection, or if a recycling service picks up on certain days, you can leave your recyclables in the designated spot.
  • You can also take your recyclables to a drop-off center. Some of these have separate containers for different types of materials; others may use the single-stream method.
  • There are also recycling buy-back centers and those offering deposit/refund programs. You can get paid for your recyclables at these places, which might be just enough to give you the incentive to continue recycling.
  • From the collection and processing centers, recyclables are sent to a facility where the materials are sorted and cleaned in preparation for being turned into products used in manufacturing other products. Paper is recycled into newspapers, paper towels and other paper products, while aluminum, plastic and glass are used to manufacture containers. Glass can also be used in the manufacture of asphalt, while your carpeting may contain recovered plastic.

3. Some Benefits of Recycling

  • Recycling results in less waste, which means that usable acreage does not have to be turned into landfills. Manufacturers who use recycled products do not have to use as many new materials to make their products. This can help preserve natural resources.

What It Really Means To Go Green

  • Going green means trying your best to live in such a way as to protect and preserve the environment. In doing this, you not only reap the benefits of cleaner air, water and soil, but your efforts also have a global effect.
  • Going green can be simple. Taking your own coffee mug and drinking glass to work and cleaning and reusing them each day avoid use of disposable cups. Turning off power strips and unplugging appliances that do not require a constant flow of energy for operation is another way. Using cleaning supplies that are biodegradable or made of natural products, carpooling to work and combining errands are also good ways to go green.

Reduce Your Carbon Footprint

  • You may have heard about reducing your carbon footprint, but first you need to know what it is and how you leave it. Your carbon footprint is a measurement of how much you contribute to the greenhouse-gas effect simply through your day-to-day living. This includes the way you heat or cool your home, the car you drive and how much you drive, and other factors.
  • Reducing your carbon footprint is simple: Make sure your home is energy efficient by turning off lights and having enough insulation; keep your car running as efficiently as possible with frequent tune-ups and tire-pressure checks; and share rides or use alternative transportation such as bicycles or mass transit.