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This version of NSU News has been archived as of February 28, 2019. To search through archived articles, visit nova.edu/search. To access the new version of NSU News, visit news.nova.edu.

This version of SharkBytes has been archived as of February 28, 2019. To search through archived articles, visit nova.edu/search. To access the new version of SharkBytes, visit sharkbytes.nova.edu.

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Division of Public Relations and Marketing Communications
Nova Southeastern University
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796

nova.edu/prmc

SharkBytes Archives

Contact

Division of Public Relations and Marketing Communications
Nova Southeastern University
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796

(954) 262-5353
(800) 541-6682 x25353
Fax: (954) 262-3954
communications@nova.edu

CAHSS Faculty Presents at Omega Psi Phi Chapter at George Mason University on Colonel Charles Young

David Kilroy, Ph.D., at Omega Psi Phi fraternity at George Mason University

David Kilroy, Ph.D.

David Kilroy, Ph.D.

David Kilroy, Ph.D. faculty in NSU’s College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences (CAHSS), was an invited speaker to provide a talk on Colonel Charles Young to the George Mason University chapter of Omega Psi Phi, the nation’s oldest black fraternity.

Among his accomplishments, Young was the third African American to graduate from West Point and the first to achieve the rank of colonel. He was an honorary inductee into the fraternity and he remains a figure of great significance and inspiration to its members just over a hundred years later. Kilroy’s talk was based on his book, For Race and Country: The Life and Career of Colonel Charles Young,” (Praeger 2003).

Kilroy’s teaching and research interests include U.S. foreign relations and the correlation between U.S. foreign policy and issues of domestic American cultural and political identity. His second book, Days of Decision: Turning Points in U.S. Foreign Policy, co-authored with Michael Nojeim, Ph.D., in 2011, offers 12 case studies of major pendulum shifts in U.S. foreign policy, from the Spanish-American War in 1898 to the U.S. response to 9/11. He is faculty in the Department of History and Political Science.