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This version of NSU News has been archived as of February 28, 2019. To search through archived articles, visit nova.edu/search. To access the new version of NSU News, visit news.nova.edu.

This version of SharkBytes has been archived as of February 28, 2019. To search through archived articles, visit nova.edu/search. To access the new version of SharkBytes, visit sharkbytes.nova.edu.

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Division of Public Relations and Marketing Communications
Nova Southeastern University
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796

nova.edu/prmc

SharkBytes Archives

Contact

Division of Public Relations and Marketing Communications
Nova Southeastern University
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796

(954) 262-5353
(800) 541-6682 x25353
Fax: (954) 262-3954
communications@nova.edu

Does Turkey Really Make You Sleepy

Dr.-Deborah-Ann-Mulligan-MD-Lab-Coat-2016-1-002-212x300

Deborah Ann Mulligan, M.D., FAAP, FACEP

In a recent interview with First News with Jimmy Cefalo, Deborah Ann Mulligan, M.D., FAAP, FACEP, professor, Dr. Kiran C. Patel College of Osteopathic Medicine, talked about some of the issues that come up every year for Thanksgiving.

During the interview Dr. Mulligan explained that the repeated turkey myth stems from the fact that turkey contains the amino acid tryptophan, which forms the basis of brain chemicals that make people tired.

Consuming large amounts of carbohydrates and alcohol may be the real cause of a post-Thanksgiving-meal snooze.

 

Click Here to listen the full interview.